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A Ghost Town "hunt factor"... Part 2. → What I factor in for those Nevada towns.

May 21, 2019 07:19AM avatar
George, you are o the right track, and looking at your chart was mostly correct. It is very good to know the Population of a tone, and it's extra handy to know the Life-Span of a town. However, your calculation of People X Years of existence doesn't amount to much for a few reasons:

• The peak population is very, very seldom the number of people for each year the town was alive.

• The 'type' of town makes a lot of difference due to frequency of passing visitors, if there are any.

Here are some clips I altered from easily found comments about each town you listed and the point of interest I gathered from them. When I name each town in Bold print, I'll add your comment about Population and Active years in Red. Then I'll highlight the key points I was alert for in Bold. My overview thoughts are in Brown. Here we go:


COBRE: Pop. '60' 1905 - 1937
The year was 1905. Cobre boomed in 1906 when the Western Pacific Railroad moved its headquarters from Winnemucca to Cobre. The town supported a hotel and a post office opened in 1906 along with other businesses and stores. As Cobre grew, it developed a reputation for violence. There were several murders during the next few years and by 1910 the town had a population of only sixty. Cobre had reached its peak. While ore trains from Ely kept coming through Cobre, passenger and freight traffic declined during the ensuing years. By 1937 Cobre was labeled a ghost town even though twenty people lived there. In 1948 the Railroad abandoned Cobre as a shipping point. Cobre’s end came on May 31, 1956 the post office closed for good.

Cobre was alive for about 32 years, Had a hotel, Post Office, other businesses and stores, but only reached a peak population of '60' in 1910 after four years. Then the main activity in Cobre was ore trains as passenger and freight declined in the years that followed 1910. Only a small number of people, mostly RR workers, remained as the town declined, and a few remaining business owners.


DELANO: Pop. '50' 1880 - 1960
History has it that an Indian led two white men to a gold deposit in the area in 1872. The Chicago Gold and Silver Mining Company gained control of many of the mines in that same year. Great hopes were raised in 1876 when the Servia and Slavonia Mining Company with a capital stock of $10 million came to Delano. Without any mining in the district the company quietly disappeared in several years. Limited mining continued during the rest of the 1870s and 1880s with only twelve miners working the mines. While a camp had formed over the years, a saloon was the only business in Delano and supplies came in from Tecoma. The main object hindering Delano’s development was the lack of water. The nearest source was three miles away. Mining was sporadic through the next eighty years. From the early 1920s to the early 1960s Delano’s population stayed between thirty and fifty. In the 1960s production fell even lower and only ten people resided in the town. One of Elko County’s best ghost towns was gone forever, the victim of a 40,000-acre fire that consumed the town in 1996.

Delano was mainly a mining community more than a true established town Limited mining for two decades and only a dozen miners working scattered mines. A 'camp town' with mainly one saloon business. Sporadic mining over 60 years with a varying population of miners in the area numbering from 30 to 50. More of a scattered and transient type population.


METROPOLIS: Pop. '700' 1909 - 1920
Site located NW of Wells, Nevada in 1909. For planned irrigated acres to be cultivated, and for a planned city of 7,500. In 1911 they had graded streets, cement sidewalks, fire hydrants, street lights all laid out with a 4 square block commercial district. That contained a 3-story brick hotel. Anticipating many people coming here, the SPRR ran a spur to town, built a large depot, and they also had a shaded city park. With trees. By 1912 the town began to populate and acreage was sold. Due to a court decision regarding water use, Metropolis residents were left with only enough water enough for the town and 4,000 acres of farmland. Added to that were problems caused by drought, an infestation of crickets, and by 1913 the troubles grew. The local newspaper ceased publication.

Many families left, but those who stayed were rewarded soon by increased water due to acquiring the rights from those that left, which resulted in more than fifteen years of good times by all and Metropolis thrived through with a smaller population. When the big Lincoln School opened in 1914 Metropolis settled down to steady agricultural production until about 1925. Then, Farming decreased steadily and the Railroad removed its spur that year. Buildings eventually were abandoned, sold or moved away. The hotel burned in 1936 and the Lincoln School taught its last class in 1947. Metropolis is dead as a town.

Another account: It all started in 1909 with the purchase of 40,000 acres of land below Emigrant Canyon. 34 homesteads started a high-powered promotional campaign. About 95 percent of its population was Mormon. By the end of 1911, there were 700 residents. Its biggest boom year was 1912 and Metropolis’s future looked promising with the coming of the railroad. But it was not to be. Metropolis’s wet years ended in 1914 when exceptional dryness devastated crops. The draught extended through 1918. A typhoid epidemic it the town in February 1916 killing many of those who had stayed. By 1920 less than 100 people remained. Over the years, the buildings in the town either succumbed to the elements or were moved to other locations but many ruins tell the town’s story. HBC

Big plans for a bigger-size town started in 1909. Construction in 1911 had laid out a town of streets and preparation that was 4 square blocks for the Commercial Area. Note: I believe the general scale used at the time in that area was 8 blocks = 1 mile, so that would make the Commercial Area about ½ mile by ½ mile square. An impressive size town by those plans. They had a large RR Depot and a large city park with trees for shade. In that desolate area it would seem likely such a park would draw a lot of interest so finding the exact location could prove rewarding.

By the end of 1911 they had a population of 700 people. The RR arrived and the park also was built in 1912. Trouble began in 1913. They had a drought, an infestation of crickets, and the newspaper closed. In 1914 they opened the Lincoln School, but wet years ended and they had exceptional dryness and the draught lasted through 1918. Note, too, that a lot of the activity was farming to much of the population resided on the farms and ranches outside of the town proper. Many families had left by 1913 and 1914, and a typhoid epidemic killed many of those who had stayed in early 1916, and the town was on a steady decline and decay. Hotel burned, many were crumbling or being removed, and the last class was taught at the school in 1947. The RR had removed the spur to town about 1925 as it was quickly ending its life.

Even with a quick burst then an almost faster decline, the surrounding population would have helped keep some activity together as noted. Of all the towns you listed, I feel metropolis holds the best chance for finding older coins, of that period and maybe 20 years or so before that since they still had 'pocket carry' money at the time. Perhaps it would be best to locate the main city park, and any other particular locations within that larger-size commercial area that would have drawn more human activity that could generate coin loss. Such places as dance halls, recreation locations and frequent gathering spots, other than a main city park, for holiday or other outdoor events/parties.



(Bews) SHAFTER: Pop. '40' 1909 - 1932
First named Bews in 1907, Shafter was a siding established in 1906. Lots were sold for a town and about 40 people there. A school opened in 1909 and operated until 1932. By 1959 the office was closed and the town died.

I've only searched here about 20 minutes and found a really nice condition 1902 'V' Nickel, but I still think it has potential even though it was mainly a 'siding'. It could help to isolate the site of the school that ran for about 23 years or any community gathering spot.


TECOMA: Pop. 100' 1869 - 1920
A depot station from late 1800's to about 1920. It was a silver boom stop-over. Population was about 100 residents, and it's main function was for train maintenance and shipping. Montello took over as the train stop in late 20's early 30's and Tecoma was abandoned.

The Central Pacific Railroad started the town of Tecoma in 1869. By 1873 there was a post office and a hotel along with a restaurant, a café, and two saloons and a population of sixty people. Tecoma became the major railhead for the area’s mining activity. Ranchers also took advantage of town’s rail facilities. During the next five years, the mines around Tecoma produced more than $40,000 worth of copper, but the town started to fade quickly in the 1920s. Its hotel had burned down in 1918 and was not rebuilt. Mining slowed and the town’s main reason for staying alive was its position as the area’s main rail station. But even that disappeared with the completion of the Oregon Shortline in 1925. By 1930, most of the town’s residents had left and most of the stores had closed. Most of the buildings have been moved or dismantled. Numerous concrete foundations remain as well as a small cemetery that mark the site of the former town. HBC




TOANO: Pop. '123' 1868 - 1906
The CPRR created Toano in 1868. A town soon became the major freighting and staging center in Elko county, outdoing even Elko for a while. Toano became a main supply point for towns as far away as Pioche. The town also provided service to Idaho via the newly completed Toano Road. By 1870 Toano had a population of 117had two hotels, several saloons, eateries, a blacksmith shop, and merchandise stores. Passenger and freight and stage lines were a major part of the town’s economy. Fires were a problem during its early years, and in 1873 a large fire destroyed the roundhouse and three engines. Another fire in 1874 destroyed a hotel and efforts by citizens kept the huge freight depot from being destroyed. In 1880 Toano had a population of 123, the bottom was already beginning to drop out of the stage and freight market. The completion of the Oregon Shortline in 1884 eliminated all the stage traffic heading to Idaho and the town had to rely on the dwindling traffic heading south for survival. Toano was dead by the summer of 1906. Most businesses and buildings were moved to Cobre. The railroad razed the other buildings and built tracks around Toano, adding a second set of rails.


TOBAR: Pop. '60' 1908 - 1920
Tobar was a construction camp in 1908 … A post office opened up in 1911 … the town was booming until late 1920's only the station, the school, the store and a post office remained. By 1950 just a water tower and depot.


George, you are on the right track, and looking at your chart was mostly correct. It is very good to know the Population of a tone, and it's extra handy to know the Life-Span of a town. However, your calculation of People X Years of existence doesn't amount to much for a few reasons:

• The peak population is very, very seldom the number of people for each year the town was alive.

• The 'type' of town makes a lot of difference due to frequency of passing visitors, if there are any.

Here are some clips I altered from easily found comments about each town you listed and the point of interest I gathered from them. When I name each town in Bold print, I'll add your comment about Population and Active years in Red. Then I'll highlight the key points I was alert for in Bold. My overview thoughts are in Brown. Here we go:


COBRE: Pop. '60' 1905 - 1937
The year was 1905. Cobre boomed in 1906 when the Western Pacific Railroad moved its headquarters from Winnemucca to Cobre. The town supported a hotel and a post office opened in 1906 along with other businesses and stores. As Cobre grew, it developed a reputation for violence. There were several murders during the next few years and by 1910 the town had a population of only sixty. Cobre had reached its peak. While ore trains from Ely kept coming through Cobre, passenger and freight traffic declined during the ensuing years. By 1937 Cobre was labeled a ghost town even though twenty people lived there. In 1948 the Railroad abandoned Cobre as a shipping point. Cobre’s end came on May 31, 1956 the post office closed for good.

Cobre was alive for about 32 years, Had a hotel, Post Office, other businesses and stores, but only reached a peak population of '60' in 1910 after four years. Then the main activity in Cobre was ore trains as passenger and freight declined in the years that followed 1910. Only a small number of people, mostly RR workers, remained as the town declined, and a few remaining business owners.


DELANO: Pop. '50' 1880 - 1960
History has it that an Indian led two white men to a gold deposit in the area in 1872. The Chicago Gold and Silver Mining Company gained control of many of the mines in that same year. Great hopes were raised in 1876 when the Servia and Slavonia Mining Company with a capital stock of $10 million came to Delano. Without any mining in the district the company quietly disappeared in several years. Limited mining continued during the rest of the 1870s and 1880s with only twelve miners working the mines. While a camp had formed over the years, a saloon was the only business in Delano and supplies came in from Tecoma. The main object hindering Delano’s development was the lack of water. The nearest source was three miles away. Mining was sporadic through the next eighty years. From the early 1920s to the early 1960s Delano’s population stayed between thirty and fifty. In the 1960s production fell even lower and only ten people resided in the town. One of Elko County’s best ghost towns was gone forever, the victim of a 40,000-acre fire that consumed the town in 1996.

Delano was mainly a mining community more than a true established town Limited mining for two decades and only a dozen miners working scattered mines. A 'camp town' with mainly one saloon business. Sporadic mining over 60 years with a varying population of miners in the area numbering from 30 to 50. More of a scattered and transient type population.


METROPOLIS: Pop. '700' 1909 - 1920
Site located NW of Wells, Nevada in 1909. For planned irrigated acres to be cultivated, and for a planned city of 7,500. In 1911 they had graded streets, cement sidewalks, fire hydrants, street lights all laid out with a 4 square block commercial district. That contained a 3-story brick hotel. Anticipating many people coming here, the SPRR ran a spur to town, built a large depot, and they also had a shaded city park. With trees. By 1912 the town began to populate and acreage was sold. Due to a court decision regarding water use, Metropolis residents were left with only enough water enough for the town and 4,000 acres of farmland. Added to that were problems caused by drought, an infestation of crickets, and by 1913 the troubles grew. The local newspaper ceased publication.

Many families left, but those who stayed were rewarded soon by increased water due to acquiring the rights from those that left, which resulted in more than fifteen years of good times by all and Metropolis thrived through with a smaller population. When the big Lincoln School opened in 1914 Metropolis settled down to steady agricultural production until about 1925. Then, Farming decreased steadily and the Railroad removed its spur that year. Buildings eventually were abandoned, sold or moved away. The hotel burned in 1936 and the Lincoln School taught its last class in 1947. Metropolis is dead as a town.

Another account: It all started in 1909 with the purchase of 40,000 acres of land below Emigrant Canyon. 34 homesteads started a high-powered promotional campaign. About 95 percent of its population was Mormon. By the end of 1911, there were 700 residents. Its biggest boom year was 1912 and Metropolis’s future looked promising with the coming of the railroad. But it was not to be. Metropolis’s wet years ended in 1914 when exceptional dryness devastated crops. The draught extended through 1918. A typhoid epidemic it the town in February 1916 killing many of those who had stayed. By 1920 less than 100 people remained. Over the years, the buildings in the town either succumbed to the elements or were moved to other locations but many ruins tell the town’s story. HBC

Big plans for a bigger-size town started in 1909. Construction in 1911 had laid out a town of streets and preparation that was 4 square blocks for the Commercial Area. Note: I believe the general scale used at the time in that area was 8 blocks = 1 mile, so that would make the Commercial Area about ½ mile by ½ mile square. An impressive size town by those plans. They had a large RR Depot and a large city park with trees for shade. In that desolate area it would seem likely such a park would draw a lot of interest so finding the exact locations could prove rewarding.

By the end of 1911 they had a population of 700 people. The RR arrived and the park also was built in 1912. Trouble began in 1913. They had a drought, an infestation of crickets, and the newspaper closed. In 1914 they opened the Lincoln School, but wet years ended and they had exceptional dryness and the draught lasted through 1918. Note that a lot of the activity was farming to much of the population resided on the farms and ranches outside of the town proper. Many families had left by 1913 and 1914, and a typhoid epidemic killed many of those who had stayed in early 1916, and the town was on a steady decline and decay. Hotel burned, many were crumbling or being removed, and the last class was taught at the school in 1947. The RR had removed the spur to town about 1925 as it was quickly ending its life.

Even with a quick burst then an almost faster decline. the surrounding population would have help keep some activity together as noted. Of all the towns you listed, I feel metropolis holds the best chance for finding older coins, to that period and maybe 20 years or so before that would still have been 'pocket carry' at the time. Perhaps it would be best to locate the main city park, and any other particular locations within that larger-size commercial area that would have drawn more human activity that could generate coin loss. Such places as dance halls, recreation locations and gathering spots, other than a main city park, for holiday or other outdoor events/parties.



(Bews) SHAFTER: Pop. '40' 1909 - 1932
First named Bews in 1907, Shafter was a siding established in 1906. Lots were sold for a town and about 40 people there. A school opened in 1909 and operated until 1932. By 1959 the office was closed and the town died.

I've only searched here about 20 minutes and found a really nice condition 1902 'V' Nickel, but I still think it has potential even though it was mainly a 'siding'. It could help to isolate the site of the school that ran for about 23 years or any community gathering spot.


TECOMA: Pop. 100' 1869 - 1920
A depot station from late 1800's to about 1920. It was a silver boom stop-over. Population was about 100 residents, and it's main function was for train maintenance and shipping. Montello took over as the train stop in late 20's early 30's and Tecoma was abandoned.

The Central Pacific Railroad started the town of Tecoma in 1869. By 1873 there was a post office and a hotel along with a restaurant, a café, and two saloons and a population of sixty people. Tecoma became the major railhead for the area’s mining activity. Ranchers also took advantage of town’s rail facilities. During the next five years, the mines around Tecoma produced more than $40,000 worth of copper, but the town started to fade quickly in the 1920s. Its hotel had burned down in 1918 and was not rebuilt. Mining slowed and the town’s main reason for staying alive was its position as the area’s main rail station. But even that disappeared with the completion of the Oregon Shortline in 1925. By 1930, most of the town’s residents had left and most of the stores had closed. Most of the buildings have been moved or dismantled. Numerous concrete foundations remain as well as a small cemetery that mark the site of the former town. HBC

On a positive note, this town was active for 50-60 years and had a post office and hotel, restaurant and cafe within 5 years after it started and two saloons, with a population of ‘60’ people and peaked to about 100 people. It was primarily a RR depot and main rail-head & station, and maintanance location. It served both the local mining activity and was a stopover that also serviced all the local ranching and shipping. It stayed relatively active until 1925 but declined by 1930.


TOANO: Pop. '123' 1868 - 1906
The CPRR created Toano in 1868. A town soon became the major freighting and staging center in Elko county, outdoing even Elko for a while. Toano became a main supply point for towns as far away as Pioche. The town also provided service to Idaho via the newly completed Toano Road. By 1870 Toano had a population of 117had two hotels, several saloons, eateries, a blacksmith shop, and merchandise stores. Passenger and freight and stage lines were a major part of the town’s economy. Fires were a problem during its early years, and in 1873 a large fire destroyed the roundhouse and three engines. Another fire in 1874 destroyed a hotel and efforts by citizens kept the huge freight depot from being destroyed. In 1880 Toano had a population of 123, the bottom was already beginning to drop out of the stage and freight market. The completion of the Oregon Shortline in 1884 eliminated all the stage traffic heading to Idaho and the town had to rely on the dwindling traffic heading south for survival. Toano was dead by the summer of 1906. Most businesses and buildings were moved to Cobre. The railroad razed the other buildings and built tracks around Toano, adding a second set of rails.

The term ‘major’ was significant back in those earlier RR days, and this was a ‘major’ freighting and staging location, outdoing even a few other larger-size towns of the time. It was a main supply location that serviced Idao and points south as well. One note is the new Toano Road with service to Idaho. Researching that travel route, for freight wagon and stage travel, could provide info on stops and huntable locations along that route. The populations grew to 117 in about 1½-2 years. It had plenty of hotels, saloons, businesses and mercantile stores, and for a while had an active passenger and freight service that was big for the economy. Seven years later it had 127 people when the stage and freight market ended. It had a good growth cycle and a good transient population from the passenger travel for about 20 years, then it died.


TOBAR: Pop. '60' 1908 - 1920
Tobar was a construction camp in 1908 … A post office opened up in 1911 … the town was booming until late 1920's only the station, the school, the store and a post office remained. By 1950 just a water tower and depot.

Mainly a construction camp, but those can be reasonably populated, and Tobar was until the latter 1920’s. It continued to be alive but dwindling for the next twenty years or so.

Several things to remember:

• ANY old encampment site or town site can have lost coins, etc. The more active the type of location, the greater the chance for coin and trade token loss.

• The bigger the population, and if it is in a more congested area and not a rural type of ‘community’ setting, the better.

• Old-use locations can have coins dating back to 30 years prior to the start of the site due to ‘pocket carry’ coin dates. Examples: ‘Lone Tree’ Oregon started in the mid 1860’s but I found an 1853 Large Cent, Oregon Gregg found an 185? Large Cent. And even though it wasn’t an Indian Head Cent, on our 6th WTHO, Darby found that really nice 1836 Capped Bust Dime. It dates about ~30 years before 'Lone Tree' started.

• Or, how about 'Lonesome Arch' which started about 1864 but last month 'Zincoln' eyeballed then swept his coil over an 1851 'Trime,' the nice silver 3¢ piece. Old stuff is still awaiting, but it calls for patience and persistence.

• A real trick is trying to get a look at how a town was laid out. It can be difficult to fid old photos or hand-sketched maps of most of the old RR towns or out-of-the-way mining encampments. That’s the kind of information to research because it helps us learn of the particular places that were more popular for people to use in those early days, thus we can concentrate our efforts on them.

Of all the towns you mentioned, a few of which I have detected since the latter 1980's, I have my favorites I want to hunt. #1 on MY list in Metropolis, #2 is Shafter and #3 is Tecoma and #4 is Toano.

Just thoughts.

Monte

Oh, one final thing that stays I my mind ... boldly! I have never been to Delano, just the others. I have encountered a tick now and then in all towns except Shafter, and sometimes a few 'extra' ticks that I don't care for.

But even going back to the latter 1980's when I worked Toano and Tecoma a few times along with all the more recent visits on WTHO's, I credit Metropolis with letting me encounter More SNAKES than all the other towns have combined!!! I hate SNAKES!


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Subject Author Views Posted

Ghost town hunt factor Attachments

glabelle 171 May 20, 2019 10:21AM

A Ghost Town "hunt factor" is a serious consideration. Been doing it since late 1968.

Monte 122 May 21, 2019 01:04AM

A Ghost Town "hunt factor"... Part 2. → What I factor in for those Nevada towns.

Monte 109 May 21, 2019 07:19AM

Re: A Ghost Town "hunt factor"... Part 2. - Giving back Attachments

glabelle 114 May 21, 2019 08:55AM

A terrific photo! Thank You!thumbs up

Monte 96 May 21, 2019 09:42AM

More maps Attachments

glabelle 154 May 21, 2019 04:38PM

MAPS! ... George, your computer tallents and generosity are appreciated!thumbs up

Monte 69 May 22, 2019 07:49AM

Re: More maps

NWCindy 67 May 22, 2019 05:08AM

Re: A Ghost Town "hunt factor" - refinement Attachments

glabelle 90 May 21, 2019 08:50AM

Re: A Ghost Town "hunt factor" - refinement

OregonGregg 83 May 21, 2019 09:01AM

Re: A Ghost Town "hunt factor" - refinement

glabelle 83 May 21, 2019 09:08AM

Re: Ghost town hunt factor

Kickindirt 89 May 20, 2019 07:47PM

Re: Ghost town hunt factor

silverhound2 93 May 20, 2019 10:08PM

Re: Ghost town hunt factor

Kickindirt 71 May 20, 2019 11:12PM

Ghost town hunt factor

UtahRich 106 May 20, 2019 02:02PM

My target

glabelle 119 May 20, 2019 02:33PM

What is my Window of Expectation?

UtahRich 68 May 20, 2019 11:34PM

Re: My target

NWCindy 82 May 20, 2019 04:02PM



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